Problematic or Prophetic?

The decision by Judge Gilstrap in the Eastern District of Texas, in Raytheon Company v. Cray, Inc., has generated much discussion and misleading commentary. Judge Gilstrap denied Cray’s Motion to Dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction and improper venue, as follows: The Federal Circuit resolved competing authorities on the issue of “an established place of …

Patent Bill Aims to Help Inventors Protect and Enforce Patents

On June 21, 2017, Sen. Christopher Coons (D-Del) introduced legislation that would limit patent validity challenges at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO”), and strengthen patent owners’ rights in court. The bill is named the Support Technology & Research for Our Nation’s Growth and Economic Resilience Act, or the “STRONGER Patents Act of 2017,” …

Oil States Energy Services LLC v. Greene’s Energy Group, LLC

Oil States

639 F.App’x 639 (Fed. Cir. 2016), cert. granted (June 12, 2017) (No. 16-712) Supreme Court of the United States The Supreme Court has granted certiorari in Oil States Energy Services LLC v. Greene’s Energy Group, LLC to examine the constitutionality of inter partes review proceedings by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO”).  Specifically, …

Supreme Court Boosts Biosimilars By Allowing Early Notice

The Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“BPCIA”), codified in 42 U.S.C. § 262, ushered in a new wave of patent litigation for large molecules, and a bounty of questions regarding the application and interpretation of the statue.  In Sandoz v. Amgen, –U.S.–, June 12, 2017, The Supreme Court weighed in for the …

Supreme Court Finds Patent Exhaustion Alive and Well

Shane Olafson and Ryan Swank

Under the longstanding doctrine of patent exhaustion, a patentee’s rights are “exhausted” once an authorized sale has occurred.  For many years, however, some courts have recognized exceptions to the doctrine, such as when the parties agree to various post-sale restrictions in an arms-length transaction, or where the patented item was first sold outside of the …

U.S. Supreme Court Issues Ruling Substantially Curtailing Available Venues for Patent Infringement Actions

In a significant and long-awaited ruling governing patent litigation, the Supreme Court today in TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods reversed long-standing lower court precedent that enabled patent owners, with relatively few restrictions, to sue corporate defendants in jurisdictions in which alleged infringement occurred.  Many corporations market and sell products directly or indirectly throughout the United States, …

The Federal Circuit Already Follows ABA and IPO Recommendations

Patent

As illustrated by a recent Federal Circuit Decision, the Courts may already be following the recent recommendations of the American Bar Association Section of Intellectual Property Law (ABA), and the Intellectual Property Owner’s Association (IPO). A portion of the ABA March 25, 2017 recommendation states that with regard to Section 101, patent eligibility shall not …

Don’t Be Left Flat: Words Matter When Drafting Patent Claims

In Wasica Finance GmbH v. Continental Automotive Systems, Inc., No. 15-2078 (Fed. Cir. 2017), the patentee Wasica Finance discovered, among other things, the importance of using consistent terminology in the patent specification and claims. The patent-in-suit, now expired U.S. Patent No. 5,602,524, is directed to a system for monitoring tire pressure in vehicles. In an …